The Last Minute Shopper’s Guide to Panic Prepping

When a disaster draws near, suddenly, preppers don’t seem quite so crazy anymore.

It becomes mainstream to engage in a flurry of activity that looks like an episode of Doomsday Preppers being fast-forwarded across the screen. Panic prepping happens more often than you might think.

We see it frequently when the news outlets warn of a big storm approaching. We saw it during the Ebola scare in 2014. We saw it right before the presidential election, when pending civil unrest was a threat.

Of course, anyone who lives a prepared lifestyle knows that panic prepping is not ideal. However, we’d rather see our neighbors panic-prep that not prep at all.

This article is for those who have never really considered getting ready for an unusual event. If you need to get ready fast because something is headed your way, this may not cover ALL of your bases, but it will get you through at least a short term disaster. Nearly all of the supplies will be easily available at your local Wal-Mart, Target, or hardware store.

A better option, of course, would be to pick up these items ahead of time and having an emergency kit, sitting there ready when a storm is bearing down.

But better late than never – I encourage you to read this over, print out the shopping list, and get your supplies together.

A water supply

Many events over the past years have taught us that a water emergency can happen to anyone. In the event that your area suffers from tainted tap water, you’ll want to have a back-up supply on hand to keep your family (including pets) hydrated. This does not mean a case of 24 water bottles.

  • The thriftiest quick option is to purchase those one-gallon water jugs that are less than a dollar at the store. Get a supply that will last for 2 weeks – one per day, per family member. That will cost approximately $14 per family member.
  • You can also bottle and store tap water, but if you’re not really into the whole idea of prepping, you may not want to put forth the effort to do this. You can find instructions for building your personal water supply in this book.

A way to heat your home

This is essential in colder climates. Lack of heat can cause people to make bad choices – sometimes deadly ones – by using methods that can cause a build-up of carbon monoxide.

  • If you’re lucky, you may have a woodburning fireplace or wood stove.  If you have that, simply make sure you have enough wood to burn for a while.
  • You may also have a natural gas fireplace. Most of the time, these work when the power goes out, although they won’t have a blower and will only thoroughly heat one room.
  • An excellent secondary heater is the Mr. Buddy propane heater. You can attach this to a barbecue propane tank. This heater is rated for indoor use (in most states.) Find it here.  Keep at least 2 tanks of propane on hand to see you through an emergency.
  • Be prepared to close off one room where the heat source is. You can use curtains in doorways for this, or if the room has doors, stuff towels under them to keep the heat from escaping.
  • Always have a battery-operated carbon monoxide detector. Your life could depend on it.

Lights on.

When the lights go out, you’ll want to have back-up lighting. That scented candle in the middle of your coffee table isn’t going to last for days and days.

  • Buy tealights. They are safe and inexpensive. These burn for 6-7 hours apiece.
  • Don’t forget lighters!
  • Bring in your solar garden stakes at night for a cozy glow.
  • Pick up some glow bracelets for the kiddos. This is a safe way to give them some light in their bedrooms.
  • Be sure to have flashlights and extra batteries on hand.
  • We love our LED headlamps. With these, you can do things hands-free at night, like reading, knitting, or other tasks that require steady illumination.

A way to cook

Even if you have loads of food in your pantry, it won’t help you much if you have no way to cook it. Here are a few options.

  • If you have a gas stove, it will probably work during most power outages. A great way to test this is to simply throw the breaker and make certain it still comes on. Some stoves have an electric ignition and will not turn on without being manually lit.
  • A backyard barbecue is another thing that most folks already have on hand that can pull double duty during an emergency. Mine also has a burner.
  • A Kelly Kettle is a popular rocket stove that can use any type of biomass to boil water quickly. Find one here.
  • A camp stove is another excellent option. Coleman is a trusted name and these can be found in any store with a camping/outdoors department. This one is the classic. Be sure that you have enough propane to last for 3 meals per day for a couple of weeks.

A food supply

Finally, you need a food supply, and it needs to be shelf-stable. During a longer power outage, the items in your refrigerator will spoil fairly quickly, and eating something that could make you sick is even less of a good idea during an emergency. There are numerous options.

  • Buy some buckets. Buckets of food are generally considered a one month supply for one person. The fastest, easiest way to build a food supply for emergencies is to pick up a bucket for each member of the family. You can find some good quality, non-GMO buckets here.
  • Stock up on canned soups, stews, fruits, and vegetables. These will last a long time on a basement shelf and can be heated up very quickly to conserve your fuel.
  • Get canned meat: tuna, salmon, chicken, and ham are all readily available.
  • Consider no-cook options. If you don’t have a secondary method, look to things like peanut butter and crackers, dried fruit, canned veggies, and tortillas. Here’s a whole list of no-cook foods.
  • Protein powder is a good option to make a filling, tasty beverage (a lot of emergency food is pretty low on protein.)
  • Keep dry milk on hand for coffee, cereal, and drinking.
  • Skip the beans and rice. Unless you are cooking them over the fire in your fireplace, you are going to use far too much fuel to prepare stuff like that from scratch. Focus on foods that can be reheated or prepared in less than 20 minutes.

The most important thing to remember here is not to rely on the things in your fridge and freezer during a lengthy power outage. You want to eat those things for the first day or so, working from fridge to freezer, but after that, you need to switch to shelf-stable mode.

Disposables

It may not be green, but the last thing you’re going to want to deal with during a power outage in which you may not have hot water is washing tons of dishes or laundry. Pick up some disposable items to have on hand for basic sanitation:

  • Paper plates
  • Styrofoam cups
  • Plastic flatware
  • Napkins
  • Paper towels
  • Cleaning wipes

Something to do

In our electronics-addicted world, one of the most difficult adjustments for some people during a power outage is the loss of their electronic device. You’ll want to have a few things on hand for entertainment that doesn’t require an internet connection or a gadget.

  • Get some books and save them for just such an emergency.
  • Pick up some magazines and put them away so they’ll be fresh and new.
  • Pick up games, puzzles, and other old-fashioned forms of entertainment.
  • Do crafts like knitting, carving, painting, or scrapbooking.
  • Here’s a list of power-outage activities for the kiddos.

Keep it all together.

I can’t encourage you enough to buy these things ahead of time. When an emergency is pending, everyone else is out there with the same idea. However, if you’ve waited too late, now you know exactly what you need. Go here to download your FREE shopping list. This will make it easier to ensure that you have everything you need when you head out for your shopping spree.

It’s wise not to intermingle your emergency supplies with your other supplies. Pick up 1-2 large plastic tubs and keep the majority of your supplies in them. Not your propane though – you will want to ensure that propane is stored correctly. (Here’s how to do that.)

It’s better late than never.

For those of you who are well-prepared, are there any other last minute items that you’d recommend for people who are just getting started?

Shares 0
Daisy Luther

About the Author

Daisy Luther

Please feel free to share any information from this site in part or in full, leaving all links intact, giving credit to the author and including a link to this website and the following bio. Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her websites, The Organic Prepper and DaisyLuther.com She is the author of 4 books and the co-founder of Preppers University, where she teaches intensive preparedness courses in a live online classroom setting. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter,.

Follow Daisy Luther:

Leave a Comment:

You Need More Than Food to Survive
50-nonfood-stockpile-necessities

In the event of a long-term disaster, there are non-food essentials that can be vital to your survival and well-being. Make certain you have these 50 non-food stockpile essentials. Sign up for your FREE report and get prepared.

We respect your privacy.