February 17, 2014

Pediatrician with a God Complex Refuses to Treat Unvaccinated Children

Let’s talk about the meaning of a “god-complex”. Wikipedia defines a “god complex” as

“an unshakable belief characterized by consistently inflated feelings of personal ability, privilege, or infallibility. A person with a god complex may refuse to admit the possibility of their error or failure, even in the face of complex or intractable problems or difficult or impossible tasks, or may regard their personal opinions as unquestionably correct.”  

Many parents can find a living, breathing example of a person suffering from a “god complex” as close as the family pediatrician’s office.

One such example is the anonymous pediatrician who wrote this essay, which was published by The Daily Beast.

I always ask if the children are vaccinated, or if the parents intend to vaccinate once the child is born. If the answer is no, I politely and respectfully tell them we won’t be the right fit. We don’t accept patients whose parents won’t vaccinate them.

When I read the essay, I had to check to see if it was satire. Unfortunately, it’s legitimate.  That a doctor that you are paying to care for your child feels so omnipotent is simply mindblowing. That a person who swore an oath to do no harm would feel so strongly about imposing his will on parents speaks volumes about his high opinion of himself, even though he says that isn’t the case:

The physician-patient relationship, like so many other human relationships, requires an element of trust. I certainly neither want nor expect a return to the paternalistic “doctor knows best” mindset of bygone years, but I do need to know that patient’s parents respect my training and expertise. Refusing an intervention I desperately want all children to receive makes that respect untenably dubious.

All over the country, doctors are now refusing to treat children who are unvaccinated. This, in my opinion, is just another bullying tactic to try to force a parent’s hand.  It pushes them to worry about well-child visits, about what you’ll do if your child becomes ill and needs surgery, about how you would acquire needed antibiotics for a routine ear infection. And with Obamacare, you can be assured the push for standardization of care and for vaccines is going to become even more aggressive.

The pediatrician who wrote this, who is apparently sheepish enough about his views that he used a pseudonym for his essay, pushes the mainstream propaganda with this paragraph (links to his sources are embedded):

There are few questions I can think of that have been asked and answered more thoroughly than the one about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines.

The measles-mumps-rubella vaccine does not cause autism.

The HPV vaccine is safe.

There is no threat to public health from thimerosal.

In response to this, I supply my own links:

Finally, he wraps it up, and I have to say, I’d be thrilled to be kicked out of his office because I do think he is misguided. I sincerely think he believes what he is pushing, but I also think he has been brainwashed, not educated.

I often wonder why a parent who believes vaccines are harmful would want to bring their children to a medical doctor at all. After all, for immunizations to be as malign as their detractors claim, my colleagues and I would have to be staggeringly incompetent, negligent or malicious to keep administering them.

If vaccines caused the harms Jenny McCarthy and her ilk claim they do, then my persistence in giving them must say something horrifying about me. Why would you then want to bring your children to me when you’re worried about their illnesses? As a parent myself, I wouldn’t trust my children’s care to someone I secretly thought was a fool or a monster.

It’s not merely that I don’t want to have to worry that the two-week-old infant in my waiting room is getting exposed to a potentially-fatal case of pertussis if these parents bring their children in with a bad cough. It’s not just that I don’t want their kid to be the first case of epiglottitis I’ve ever seen in my career. Those are reasons enough, to be sure. But they’re not all.

What breaks the deal is that I would never truly believe that these parents trust me. Giving kids vaccines is the absolute, unambiguous standard of care, as easy an answer as I will ever be able to offer.

If they don’t trust me about that, how can I hope they would if the questions ever got harder?

I have personally had tense conversations during doctor’s visits when refusing vaccines or certain medications for my children. I have been quizzed about vaccines in the emergency room when I brought my daughter in for a broken wrist, which is clearly totally unrelated to her vaccination history. I’ve never had a doctor absolutely refuse to treat my child, but there have been some less-than-positive encounters.

It is my right as a parent to make the best choices possible for my children – choices that are based on my personal beliefs, my religious beliefs, and the research that I have diligently searched out. Medicine should not be a dictatorship, where you go in and submit your child to the doctor’s decisions. I want a doctor with whom I can partner in my child’s care, not an arrogant, all-knowing, inflexible authoritarian in a lab coat.

If you have a pediatrician who treats you condescendingly, who refuses to abide by your wishes for treatment for your children, or who refuses to consider your concerns as valid, maybe if that doctor refuses to treat your child, it is the best thing that could happen.

Dr. Joseph Mercola, a leading wellness expert, an osteopathic physician and a board-certified family medical doctor, sums it up:

It goes without saying that when you choose a physician, that physician is working for you. It is an oxymoron that a pediatrician is able to “fire” a patient; more accurately, you have a choice as to whom you trust to provide health care for you and your children.

So you can always FIRE your doctor. It is YOUR right and YOUR choice to take control of your health and your family’s health and you should NEVER allow any doctor to interfere with that right. That said, there are reports of pediatricians ostracizing patients that disagree with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) one-size-fits-all vaccination schedule. Some pediatricians will even resist answering your vaccination questions or concerns.

I find it interesting, though, that one of the most salient points raised in the Time magazine article came not from the author but from her 4-year-old daughter, who asked after receiving five vaccines:

“Why I got to get shots to make me healthy?”

And therein lies a very powerful question … (source)

Resources:

Learn more about vaccines from these resources:

VaxTruth.org

National Vaccine Information Center

Vaccination Voodoo: What YOU Don’t Know About Vaccines (reviewed HERE)

Daisy Luther

Please feel free to share any information from this site in part or in full, leaving all links intact, giving credit to the author and including a link to this website and the following bio. Daisy Luther is a single mom who lives in a small village in the mountains of Northern California, where she homeschools her youngest daughter and raises veggies, chickens, and a motley assortment of dogs and cats.   She is a best-selling author who has written several books, including The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper's Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper's Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource.  Daisy is a prolific blogger who has been widely republished throughout alternative media. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health, self-reliance, personal liberty, and preparedness. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

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