Fight Dirty: How to Become a Backyard Garden Guerrilla Even If You’ve Never Grown a Tomato

April 3, 2015

Sometimes I think that the next Revolutionary War will take place in vegetable garden battlefields, all across America.

Instead of bullets, there will be seeds.  Instead of chemical warfare, there will be rainwater, carefully collected from the gutters of the house. Instead of soldiers in body armor and helmets, there will be backyard guerrillas, with bare feet, cut-off jean shorts, and wide-brimmed hats.  Instead of death, there will be life, sustained by a harvest of home-grown produce.  Children will be witness to these battles, but instead of being traumatized, they will be happy, grimy, and healthy, as they learn about the miracles that take place in a little plot of land or pot of dirt.

Every day, Big Agri and Big Biotech take steps towards food totalitarianism.  They do so flying a standard of “sustainability” but what they are actually trying to sustain is NOT our natural resources, but their control.

Does it sound dramatic to state that if things continue on their current path of “sustainability” that we are all going to die?  If you think I’m overstating this, read on.  The case is clear that we are going to soon be “sustained” right into starvation via Agenda 21.

  • The European Union is in the process of criminalizing all seeds that are not “registered”.  This means that the centuries-old practice of saving seeds from one year to the next may soon be illegal.
  • Collecting rainwater is illegal in many states, and regulated in other states.  The United Nations, waving their overworked banner of “sustainability” is scheming to take over control of every drop of water on the globe.  In some countries people who own wells are now being taxed and billed on the water coming from those sources.  Nestle has admitted that they believe all water should be privatized so that everyone has to pay for the life-giving liquid and they continue to pump millions of gallons out of California, despite the fact that the nation’s major food-producing state is being crippled by its fourth year of drought.
  •  Codex Alimentarius (Latin for “food code”) is a global set of standards created by the CA Commission, a body established by a branch or the United Nations back in 1963. As with all globally stated agendas, however, CA’s darker purpose is shielded by the feel-good words.  As the US begins to fall in line with the “standards” laid out by CA, healthful, nutritious food will be something that can only be purchased via some kind of black market of organically produced food.
  • Regulations abound in the 1200 page Food Safety Modernization Act that will put many small farmers out of business, while leaving us reliant on irradiated, chemically treated, genetically-modified “food”.

In the face of this attack on the agrarian way of life, the single, most meaningful act of resistance that any individual can perform is to use the old methods and grow his or her own food.

Growing your own food wields many weapons.

  • You are preserving your intelligence by refusing to ingest toxic ingredients.  Many of these ingredients (and the pesticides sprayed on them) have been proven to lop off IQ points.
  • You are nourishing your body by feeding yourself real food.  Real food, unpasteurized, un-irradiated, with all of the nutrients intact, will provide you with a strong immune system and lower your risk of many chronic diseases.  As well, you won’t be eating the toxic additives that affect your body detrimentally.
  • You are avoiding GMOs. More and more foods are genetically modified. If you purchase processed food, there’s a very good chance you’re consuming genetically modified organisms.  GMOs are not only an unknown health factor, but most are either heavily sprayed with pesticides or have the pesticide built right in.
  • You are not participating in funding Big Food, Big Agri, and Big Pharma when you grow your own food.  Every bite of food that is NOT purchased via the grocery store is representative of money that does NOT go into the pockets of these companies who are interested only in their bottom lines.  Those industries would be delighted if everyone was completely reliant on them.
  • You are not susceptible to the control mechanisms and threats.  If you are able to provide for yourself, you need give no quarter to those who would hold the specter of hunger over your head.  You don’t have to rely on anyone else to feed your family.

Maybe you haven’t yet grown a garden because you aren’t sure how to get started. Maybe you have a track record as a tomato plant serial killer. Maybe you live in the city or have an HOA.  Don’t despair!  There are still more ways than you ever imagined to get down and dirty!

The Home Grown Food Summit is going on this coming week.

It’s 7 days of absolutely FREE classes to help you get started.  The speakers are some of the greatest garden generals around, ready to lead you into battle.  Here are just a few of the Food Freedom luminaries that you’ll hear from:

  • Mike Adams of Natural News
  • Sally Fallon of the Weston Price Foundation
  • Joel Salatin of Polyface Farms
  • Wardeh Harmon of Traditional Cooking School
  • Laurie Neverman of Common Sense Homesteading
  • Marjory Wildcraft of Grow Your Own Groceries
  • Rick Austin, the Survivalist Gardener

Each day there are 4 or 5 workshops. Don’t worry about your schedule, because they’ll each be available to listen to for 24 hours.

Here is a just a sample of the topics covered:

  •     The 6 laws of plant growth
  •     The easiest food source to grow
  •     How to know if a chicken is a good egg layer just by glancing at it
  •     3 gardening techniques for those with back problems or limited mobility
  •     Which fish are so hardy they come back to life even after being dried out
  •     How to recognize the signs that a plant wants to communicate with you
  •     Why beginning hunters should never use a tree stand
  •     How to be able to identify wild plants while driving 60 mph down the road
  •     The 3 easiest vegetables to save seeds from
  •     Why the jungles of southeast Asia affect what you feed your chickens
  •     The health benefits of eating fermented foods
  •     How the size of the chicken’s comb determines if it will survive your winter
  •     Which plants you should never plant in an aquaponic system
  •     The 7 ways we change the world when we grow our own food
  •     How safe is pressure canning for preserving food
  •     The 13 weeds that can ensure you never go hungry
  •     Why growing heritage breeds of livestock is vital for your grand children
  •     How many gallons of water you need per pound of fish in a tank
  •     The 3 most irresistible plants that kids love growing
  •     The difference between pressure canning and water bath canning
  •     How many eggs one hen can lay in a year
  •     The best age to start giving children significant garden responsibility
  •     The biggest mistake most people make in designing permaculture guilds
  •     8 reasons you”re insane if you”re not growing some of your own food
  •     How free compost can destroy your garden; what to watch out for and how to avoid costly mistakes
  •     The importance of resilience in today’s world
  •     How to overcome problems with walnut trees in food forests
  •     Why you should always start at the top of a hill when designing your water systems
  •     The secret to a green thumb
  •     What percentage of food in grocery stores is actually toxic to the human body
  •     17 techniques for irrigating without piping or tanks
  •     An ancient indicator of true health that is still valid today
  •     The 7 most useful hand tools in a backyard homestead
  •     How to remove heavy metals from your garden soil
  •     What the healthiest people in history ate for dinner
  •     How a bowl of soup increases by $25 when you top it with this gourmet insect
  •     How to grow a secret garden of survival
  •     How many pounds of potatoes a beginner can grow in 200 ft.²
  •     Why the most effective form of pest-control may actually be hiding in your compost pile
  •     The 3 ways a rooster helps your flock of hens
  •     And much, more more!

This is a once-a-year event.  Don’t miss it! This is free information, and I really want everyone to have access to it.

Consider every bite of food that you grow for your family to be an act of rebellion.

There is a food revolution brewing.  People who are educating themselves about Big Food, Big Agri, and the food safety sell-outs at the FDA are disgusted by what is going on. We are refusing to tolerate these attacks on our health and our lifestyles. We are refusing to be held subject to Agenda 21’s version of “sustainability”.

Firing a volley in this war doesn’t have to be bloody.  Resistance can begin as easily attending an online workshop.

I promise, you’ll be inspired to fight dirty after attending the Home Grown Food Summit.

Sign Me Up for the Revolution!
Daisy Luther

About the Author

Daisy Luther

Please feel free to share any information from this site in part or in full, leaving all links intact, giving credit to the author and including a link to this website and the following bio. Daisy Luther is a single mom who lives in a small village in the mountains of Northern California, where she homeschools her youngest daughter and raises veggies, chickens, and a motley assortment of dogs and cats.   She is a best-selling author who has written several books, including The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper's Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper's Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource.  Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her websites, The Organic Prepper and DaisyLuther.com She is the author of 4 books and the co-founder of Preppers University, where she teaches intensive preparedness courses in a live online classroom setting. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

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